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« Prop23 – Some (Private Sector) Unions Get It | Main | Scattershots – 20sep2010 »

20 September 2010

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papertiger

George you are really good at this stuff. Taking a page out of history and applying it to contemporary times, I mean.

You might enjoy this excerpt from Mike Pence's Hillsdale College speech.

No finer, more moving, or profound an understanding of the nature of the presidency and the command of humility placed upon it has ever been expressed than by President Coolidge. He, like Lincoln, lost a child while he was president, a son of sixteen. "The day I became president," Coolidge wrote, "he had just started to work in a tobacco field. When one of his fellow laborers said to him, 'If my father was president I would not work in a tobacco field,' Calvin replied, 'If my father were your father you would.' "

While in the White House, President Coolidge's son contracted blood poisoning from an incident on the South Lawn. Coolidge wrote, "What might have happened to him under other circumstances we do not know, but if I had not been president.…" And then he continues, "In his suffering he was asking me to make him well. I could not.

"When he went, the power and glory of the Presidency went with him."

A sensibility such as this, and not power, is the source of presidential dignity, and must be restored. It depends entirely upon character, self-discipline, and an understanding of the fundamental principles that underlie not only the republic but life itself. It communicates that the president feels the gravity of his office and is willing to sacrifice himself; that his eye is not upon his own prospects but on the storm of history through which it is his responsibility to navigate with the specific powers accorded to him and the limitations placed upon them not merely by man in his design but by God in His.

Link

Anyway I wanted to let you know.

Someone read it.

George Rebane

Great connection papertiger, thank you. For readers who may not know the publication Imprimis from Hillsdale College, it's worth a read and the price is right - free, mailed to your home.

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