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« ‘Whose fault?’ and ‘market morality’ | Main | That droning you hear … »

17 June 2012

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Comments

Earl Crabb

You never cease to amaze me, George.

Todd Juvinall

Very nice memories George of your good friends. The murder of their son in Pakistan is still in my mind and I am amazed at their attempts through the Foundation to better understand the Muslim mind. Humans are certainly unique.

Douglas Keachie

Yes Todd, humans are unique, and to subsume 1 plus billion humans all under one monniker, with one set of attributes, is unfortunately, not so unique.

Russ Steele

Interesting connection between music and computer science. Many computer scientists are excellent musicians. Judea appears to make the case even stronger.

Thanks for sharing your connection with this giant in the field of AI.

Gregory

Study with the right professor and you can have a great name to drop in the future!

Russ, there was a study circa 1970 by GE to find out which majors (beside math and science) might make decent software engineers, as "computer science" was just being ramped up as a department and demand was high.

The verdict was that music majors had the highest aptitude for computing among the liberal artists.

I recall in Claremont in the mid 70's, the Pomona College Symphony's first trumpet, first trombone, first horn, first clarinet, a solid second violin and primary percussionist were all math and science students from Harvey Mudd. I know the fellow who instructs Brass at Pomona and he tells me Mudd still supplies a large number of instrumentalists. One more recent one is an NUHS grad (where they were in band and chamber choir), now on a PhD track in physics at UC Davis. Another NU kid, chamber choir, is now studying theoretical chemical physics on a graduate fellowship at Harvard, and yes, much of that work is computer simulations.

Douglas Keachie

Somewhere around here I have a copy of "Pacific High" which definitely features Philippe Kahn and I thought also featured Eugene "Gene" Wang, I think recorded before Gene took off for Symantec. I photographed the two of them playing together at a Santa Clara Hotel near Great America way back when we cheered Borland on. Why wouldn't we? Unlike Microsoft who wanted to charge and arm and a leg, they gave me full rights to use Pascal and C++ for my classes, from my smoozing (certainly not in my job description) in exchange for a set of prints, way back then.

Music is predictable, Math is predictable, and Programming is predictable, except when they are not. Patterns of iterations are common to all three, as well as other stuff. BTW, if you are half deaf, you have a whole different set of rules for dealing with audio than the average normal hearing person. Some make excellent musicians, and some just don't. Keachie doesn't do Karaoke.

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