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25 February 2015

Comments

Russ Steele

Many citizens in Nevada County get their Internet from wireless providers. These are mom and pop business that do not have the staff necessary to provide the flood of federal paperwork that will be required once the Feds take over the Internet under FCC Title II. These ISPs will have to hire more staff to handle the reporting, this will increase the price of the service. This increased cost will be added to the special fees that are now on phone bill will soon be on Internet service bills, this will also increase the cost of the services and the cost of collection by the ISPs.

Many families do not have Internet today, due to the cost. As the costs of Internet increases under Title II, more citizens will drop their connections, and go back to using Internet Cafes and Library Tech Centers. This will have an impact on the wireless providers bottom line. Many of the mom and pop wireless providers will be forced out of business by Federal regulations. One fairness law suite under Title II will finish off these mom and pop ISPs even faster than the cost issue. Stay tuned.

Walt

"Screw you Congress, We have a solution in need of a problem. And nope, I'm not going to tell you what it is.. I work for Obama, and I don't have to talk to you.."
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/414380/fcc-chair-refuses-testify-congress-ahead-net-neutrality-vote-andrew-johnson

Ben Emery

And you will benefit off of these regulations? You've got it- Those who have he most money to spend. They are afraid of somebody actually sharing information freely and people breaking out into independent thoughts, especially when it comes to the very cozy private/ public sector relationship. Calling everything conspiracy theory is the insult of the times for such independent thinking.

George Rebane

BenE 1116am - Translation please.

Brad C.

Perhaps we can talk about the specifics of the ruling. I did not see anything that seemed too threatening. But, who knows how it will play out.

http://www.fcc.gov/document/fcc-adopts-strong-sustainable-rules-protect-open-internet

Russ Steele

In reference to my comment above, the FCC rules may exempt the mom and pop WISPs from reporting, thus reduces staffing needs.

Order adopts a temporary exemption from the transparency enhancements for fixed and mobile providers with 100,000 or fewer subscribers, and delegates authority to our Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau to determine whether to retain the exception and, if so, at what level.

fish

I did not see anything that seemed too threatening.

It very rarely does!


George Rebane

Net Neutrality – Here’s the simple version of what all this is about. First, we have to understand that there are two dimensions to the stuff (packets of ones and zeros) transmitted over the internet – spatial and temporal, or quantity and time. There are also two kinds of traffic on the internet – that required for the administration and control of the network (pipes and nodes), and the traffic containing content (data and program code) for which the internet was developed. The content traffic is the revenue producing part of the internet. Content is further divided into two types – realtime files and non-realtime files. Realtime files contain data like movies and music, and to be enjoyably consumed, they have a temporal component to their transmission. You don’t want to be listening to a song that suddenly gets timed out for few seconds while waiting for the rest of it to arrive. Realtime files are consumed in the perceived time dimension, and its pieces (burst transmitted) must therefore arrive in your home computer in a timely manner so that the pieces can be stitched together and played seamlessly. Non-realtime data files, which includes most web pages, don’t have that requirement.

At this point, most readers will understand that for all kinds of files to be transmitted across the WWW, some must have priority over others – either transmitted over broader band links or being jumped up in the server ques at the various nodes in the cloud. This has always been the capability of the internet, and it has been practiced without fuss or any regulation. But recently, people have started offering services that use the cloud like broadcast airwaves, transmitting all kinds of realtime files from here to there. In other words, in this kind of environment every packet is just not like any other packet. As this kind of traffic begins to dominate, internet infrastructure providers say that this kind of special treatment of realtime files has added costs, and some of that should be passed on to service providers like Netflix and/or consumers. You know, regular open market type stuff.

Of course, realtime file services are protesting and want to spread the higher costs of their transmissions over the entire population of internet users – they want the net to be cost 'neutral' as to the kinds of packets that are transmitted regardless of the requirements of their timely arrivals. These guys have hired lobbyists who have made the case to Leviathan that here’s another area to regulate for our benefit – the same old story we’ve heard so many times before. And since the prime purpose of Big Government is always to become bigger and more encompassing, that has been an easy sell, especially since we have had the current batch pinheads in the White House.

But the real bad part of the net neutrality regs is what they portend for the future development of the web and web services. Heretofore we’ve enjoyed “permissionless innovation”, but soon that will be no more. The naifs in the audience will holler that there is nothing in the just adopted regs that call for all this heavy-handed stuff, but the reality here, as before in so many areas, is that these regs set nothing in stone about the level and scope of future enforcement. That always grows over time until sclerosis sets in as it has in so many other industries. Take a peek at what the libertarian think tank Cato has to say about it.

http://www.cato.org/blog/fccs-net-neutrality-nuclear-option#j0UmzE:41X

Scott Obermuller

"I did not see anything that seemed too threatening."
Yeah - the income tax started out at 1%.
"But, who knows how it will play out."
Well, let's see, Brad. The fed govt just grabbed control of the most powerful information and commerce system in this country.
I'm quite sure it will be sunbeams and stardust for everyone.

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