« It worked the first time (updated 9jun13) | Main | ‘Geislingen DP Camp Years: 1945-49’ »

09 June 2013

Comments

Gregory

Lots of heads will explode if petroleum ends up being a renewable resource. The Romantic in me was saddened and the realist refreshed when that insanely deep well in Sweden failed to reveal any evidence for abiogenic hydrocarbons. Despite the hint here and there that it's a possibility, I'd not bet on it being true, not that it would make much difference at the moment anyway... with current known reserves and extraction technologies, in the least we've a couple centuries of supply.

Supporters of "The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006" will be slow to let go, and until they fry their inner Chicken Littles to an Extra Crispy they won't be happy, biogenic or abiogenic.

fish

The Romantic in me was saddened and the realist refreshed when that insanely deep well in Sweden failed to reveal any evidence for abiogenic hydrocarbons.


I think it did find evidence of the presence of non biologically derived petroleum if Thomas Golds book is to be believed.

Russ Steele

fish@11:56

That was my understanding also, but those denying it ever happened claimed the 'non-biological" was due to the drilling fluid. I am more inclined to believe the earth is creating more oil and gas. How did all those biological get buried thousands and thousands of feet up nonporous rooks? The deeper they drill the more oil and gas we find. While coal has biological evidence, I have not seen much in oil and natural gas.

Gregory

Whether abiogenic or not, it really doesn't matter much, as the issue is can we get to the stuff. An predominant abiogenic source wouldn't mean much if we only had a 50 year supply and it would take a million years to replenish.

Assume for the moment it takes a million years to replenish and we have a 250 year supply of known reserves. When should we panic... in 150 years, or now?

We will never run out of fossil fuels... they'll just get too expensive to extract just to burn, compared to other sources of energy. The market will balance it out better than politicians can, and much, much better than the carbon prohibitionists ever could.

fish

Assume for the moment it takes a million years to replenish and we have a 250 year supply of known reserves. When should we panic... in 150 years, or now?

That is the question. I'm sure someone will be along shortly to tell us that a government solution is at hand.

George Rebane

fish 1145am - the question is incomplete since it doesn't acknowledge the historical dynamics of "known reserves", nor the science that estimates the total likely reserves given the disposition of the known reserves during, say, the last half century. And the entire concern revolves around the apprehension that the advance of technology has now stopped, and therefore will contribute nothing to solving our future energy problems. History speaks strongly against such a fear factor.

fish

George I think my answer was directed more towards the pure abiotic vs. conventional theory of petroleum formation. I wasn't really considering reserves. Gregorys question was a reasonable one; abiotic formation of petroleum may be occurring....but it may happen far too slowly to be included as contributing to exploitable resources.

George Rebane

fish 320pm - I guess I missed that one. But consider for a moment, what if we determined that abiotic formation stopped a million years ago - i.e. it is currently occurring at a zero rate. Would we still not include the extant and discoverable abiotic fuels as part of our exploitable energy resources? We do that with fossil fuels.

fish

Would we still not include the extant and discoverable abiotic fuels as part of our exploitable energy resources? We do that with fossil fuels.


I suppose so....it might change how the resources were searched for eventually leading to an increase in bankable reserves. Believe me George nothing would make me happier than finding 500 (number off the top of my head) years worth of accessible oil!

Gregory

" Would we still not include the extant and discoverable abiotic fuels as part of our exploitable energy resources? We do that with fossil fuels."

Is there any reason to think we can tell them apart?

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blog powered by Typepad